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Archive for the ‘Career Transition’ Category

This story was shared with me today by Raymond Soroka of the Soroka Group. It uses an analogy between wealth and time to hit home a very important fact. Enjoy!

THE AUTHOR IS NOT KNOWN. IT WAS FOUND IN THE BILLFOLD OF COACH PAUL BEAR BRYANT, ALABAMA, AFTER HE DIED IN 1982

The Magic Bank Account

Imagine that you had won the following *PRIZE* in a contest: Each morning your bank would deposit $86,400 in your private account for your use. However, this prize has rules.
The set of rules:
1. Everything that you didn’t spend during each day would be taken away from you.
2. You may not simply transfer money into some other account.
3. You may only spend it.
4. Each morning upon awakening, the bank opens your account with another $86,400 for that day.
5. The bank can end the game without warning; at any time it can say,”Game Over!”. It can close the account and you will not receive a new one.
What would you personally do?
You would buy anything and everything you wanted right? Not only for yourself, but for all the people you love and care for. Even for people you don’t know, because you couldn’t possibly spend it all on yourself, right?

You would try to spend every penny, and use it all, because you knew it would be replenished in the morning, right?

ACTUALLY, This GAME is REAL …
Shocked ??? YES!
Each of us is already a winner of this *PRIZE*. We just can’t seem to see it.
The PRIZE is TIME

1. Each morning we awaken to receive 86,400 seconds
as a gift of life.
2. And when we go to sleep at night, any remaining time is Not credited to us.
3. What we haven’t used up that day is forever lost.
4. Yesterday is forever gone.
5. Each morning the account is refilled, but the bank can dissolve your account at any time WITHOUT WARNING…
SO, what will YOU do with your 86,400 seconds?
Those seconds are worth so much more than the same amount in dollars. Think about it and remember to enjoy every second of your life, because time races by so much quicker than you think.
So take care of yourself, be happy, love deeply and enjoy life!
Here’s wishing you a wonderful and beautiful day. Start “spending”….

“DON’T COMPLAIN ABOUT GROWING OLD…!”
SOME PEOPLE DON’T GET THE PRIVILEGE!

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR). Her expertise are recruitment, selection and career transition.

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As an Employment Consultant I come into contact with senior level individuals in career transition. Most have held President, Vice President or Director positions in mid to large size companies. When an upper level executive is outplaced the company will most often provide some type of an outplacement package. It is very important to take full advantage of these outplacement services; it can be a life line in starting to prepare for the next career opportunity. Yes, being laid off is a stressful experience; and more so for senior level management. It is quite an adjustment, especially if the individual has been with the company for 10-15+ years. Learning how to search for a job in today’s market is a job in itself.

There are services available for all individuals in career transition. Employment Ontario is a government funded program which offers many good services; however, it may fall short when trying to assist the executive with his/her job search. This type of job search involves strategic sourcing, planning and networking, not to mention a very professional looking resume which mirrors the Linkedin profile.
Below are 10 Helpful Hints:
1. Take advantage of all industry related associations.
2. Update Linkedin profile and join appropriate groups – stay visible.
3. Network, Network, Network. A suggestion may be to join a reputable networking team. The Power Team offered through ConnectUs Canada is motivational, Innovational and chalked full of networking. There is a small fee but it is well worth it.
4. If the severance package contains outplacement – use those consultants to help build your professional profile and resume.
5. Some outplacement firms also offer business level workshops on a variety of different topics.
6. Join a local executive networking club – most are informal and get together for coffee once a week.
7. Conduct research on reputable Executive Search Firms, place a call and initiate a conversation with one of the partners.
8. Prepare an Introduction Letter – it is different from the resume. It introduces your competencies, knowledge and abilities.
9. Target companies by utilizing Scott’s Directory or other Business Directories and send the Introduction Letter – not a resume.
10. Above all stay Positive and remember to P.U.S.H. (Push Until Something Happens).

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources and recognized as an expert in selection, recruitment and career transition management

As an Employment Consultant I work with Internationally Trained Professionals, new Canadians who have immigrated to Canada. They are filled with hope and anticipation of a better life and Canada does deliver socially with loads of government funded programs to help the new Canadian ease into a new life.

Unfortunately the government has not been able to change the employer’s perspective; there still exists the paradox of “Canadian experience”. All too often the new Canadian bumps up against “no Canadian experience” as the reason they are not qualified for a potential role.

As a result, too many new Canadians give up on their profession and take a lower level job because they need the income. Some do persevere, finding out what it will take to have their degree and experience recognized in Canada. Ontario has very strict guidelines for certain professions like teachers, doctors, lawyers, etc. For those new Canadians who have solid work experience in their home country in other professions such as Medical Administrative Assistant – they should invest in some type of training program which offers a Canadian diploma or certification. The following list is key to success:
1. They need to get his/her English assessed, to be considered job ready, an individual needs to be at a level 7-8.
2. They need to get an education evaluation through WES (World Education Services) or ICAS (International Credential Assessment Service of Canada). This can be started while still in their home country.
3. They need to research International Trained Bridging programs to see what it will take to bridge their experience. There is a cost associated, depending on the program.
4. Internationally trained professionals should research and participate in volunteer opportunities to help gain visibility and to become more familiar with the Canadian job market.
5. They need to do the research and put together a strategic plan which will result in their education and experience being recognized in Ontario.
Contrary to popular believe, it is not easy for new Canadians to find a job – especially in the Province of Ontario. As an employment consultant I encourage internationally trained professionals to follow the list above.

A subset of this strategic plan might be a temporary part-time job in sales, customer service or retail to help pay the bills – optimum words being “part-time”. Too many new Canadians get stuck in a full time survival job and as time passes lose the opportunity to capitalize on their international education and expertise.
I have personally witnessed the success of International Trained Professionals who create a strategic plan and follow it step by step until they are offered a professional position which capitalizes on their education and home country experience. It can and will happen with patience and determination.

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and is an expert in selection, recruitment and career transition management.

Just found and read this article by Tamsin McMahon about the trials and tribulations faced by new Canadians. Although written last year it is as true today as then. The Canadian Government portrays Canada as the land of “milk and honey” full of awesome job opportunities – which just is not true. Well, let me reiterate – there may be more opportunity in the Western and/or Eastern Provinces but is is a fact that the Greater Toronto Area is over-populated – for every job opportunity there is fierce competition. This article definitely hits the nail on the head especially when it comes to New Canadians and job opportunities in Ontario. Enjoy!

http://www.macleans.ca/economy/business/land-of-misfortune

Lee Koren is a Professional in Human Resources (PHR). She is an expert when it comes to Recruitment, Selection and Career Transition. Lee has over 25 years in Recruitment within the USA and Canada.

There is a theory circulating that the Resume is on its way out. Over the past six months there seems to be a lot of chatter on the internet. In fact, during a training session 2 weeks ago the facilitator insisted there is no longer a need for the resume. It was not clear exactly what is replacing the resume but did make me ponder this paradox. Hmm, I have been in the recruitment and selection industry for over 25 years and the resume has always been a key part of the process. However, I will be the first to admit that things do change, not always for the better, but they do change.

Of course, I realize this is only my opinion so I set out to conduct research to see what other recruiters and hiring managers think. I spoke to a multitude of people – asking the same questions – “Do you think the resume is on its way out?” and the response was an overwhelming “No”. In fact, Carolina Diaz, Senior Recruiter at Ian Martin says “I have yet to see a substitute for the resume. The hiring managers I work with want to review the resume”. She goes on to say “the format of the resume may have changed, i.e. more attention is given to the “Summary” at the top of the resume outlining key strengths and competencies”. I would definitely agree. Like it or not the “Objective” is outdated and the “Summary” is a value add replacement. A summary or profile situated directly under the heading (eye level) to whoever is reviewing the resume is very important. If done properly, it should catch the reader’s attention creating the interest for more information.

According to Laura Machan, Partner Talent Acquisition at Knightsbridge Human Capital Solutions “until I see a substitute the resume will remain a critical part of the hiring process”. Laura goes on to say that in her business she must maintain a strong relationship with her clients in order to be able to help recruit and select the right talent. Once she has done her due diligence, Laura will pick up a phone and have a one-on-one conversation with the hiring authority; however the resume is still a key piece of the process.

Doug Alexander, VP and General Manager at Wing’s Foods states “the resume is the candidate’s business card and an essential tool in candidate selection.” Doug agrees that an effective pre-screen is also required; however the resume is a key piece of the hiring process. Doug questions how a candidate would introduce themselves to a potential employer if not for the resume?

Charolene Hollister, HR Coordinator at Amdocs comments on the fact that the hiring managers at Amdocs want to see a resume. However she acknowledged that the corporate recruiters are required to conduct a thorough pre-screen and only pass on qualified applicants. When an applicant is passed on to the hiring manager the resume is not far behind.

Well by now you can see a trend; the majority of people I spoke with were adamant that the resume is not on its way out anytime soon. Will it happen? Can it happen? My philosophy is “never say never”.

In fact there is probably a talented student working on a web-based software application right now. By the time it is ready to be launched 98% of the population will have some sort of access to a computer and subsequently resume replacement software might just be successful. Until that time, the resume is alive and well; so make the most of it especially if you are in career transition. Remember the resume will not get you the job, but definitely can land you an interview.

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR). She is an expert in recruitment, selection and career transition management.

I just read this article written by Erin Carson – it has some very good pointers if one is in the market for a video resume. Most of you know I sit on the fence when it comes to a video resume – why? Well because it usually does more harm than good. People are only human and tend to be subjective which leads to unfounded and non-supported biases. However, as Erin states, a video resume may make sense if done in the right setting with the proper equipment within an industry which requires strong presentation skills – Enjoy!

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/video-resumes-the-dos-and-donts/

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing. Her core competencies are Recruitment, Selection and Career Transition.

Let’s talk about the job search function. Most will agree it is time consuming, depressing at times, humbling and lots of hard work. Yet the individuals who are successful will agree they put in place a job search strategy and worked that strategy every day. No, not all day, but for at least 3-4 hours a day. They stayed focused and committed; and yes, even though tempted to send their resume out to dozens of postings where no fit exists, controlled the urge and stayed true to their specific job search. Think about it, without a job search strategy the hunt becomes scattered and very unproductive. It’s like saving for the future without a financial strategy – good intentions but just doesn’t happen. Sitting in front of a computer and sending out resumes to jobs that do not match one’s expertise, competencies or skills is a big waste of time. I’ve spoken to hundreds of people in career transition over the past year who wonder why they are not getting any response from a resume blast. The majority of these individuals do not have a job search strategy, are not committed and definitely not focused.

Below are 10 action items which should be included in a job search strategy:
1. Prepare a solid resume which depicts strengths, core competencies, learnings and achievements.
2. Conduct an in-depth search on Indeed.ca to compare skills, job titles and roles – get creative with keyword searches.
3. Create a list of targeted companies – use google and Linkedin to research the companies and its people.
4. Attend interviewing techniques, job search strategies and networking workshops to refresh and progress.
5. Complete a behavioural assessment to help identify strengths and areas for developments – promotes awareness and allows individual strengths to be highlighted in the interview or even displayed on the resume.
6. Set up mock interviews before attending the real thing.
7. Network with family, friends, associations, schools, colleges and church parishioners.
8. Put a professional profile on Linkedin (if searching for a corporate role). Use all the tools offered by Linkedin to help stay visible and available to recruiters, HR and the Hiring Manager.
9. Take time off to have fun, relax and spend time with loved ones.
10. Continue to Push Until Something Happens.

Of course everyone is different so the job search strategy will be tailored to the individual’s strengths and competencies. It should be workable, measurable and based on individual special needs and specific requirements. In other words asking someone who is looking for a general labour job to create a profile on Linkedin is not workable.
Let’s face it, searching for a job is a job in itself. However, just like in any job the strong individual performer always comes out on top.

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources and certified as a Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing. She is passionate about recruitment, selection and career transition.


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