Bselected

Archive for the ‘Selection’ Category

Over the past several years there has been a lot of buzz going around about “Meaningful Work”. Companies are incorporating the phrase into their recruitment and performance management strategies stating “We offer a meaningful work environment”. However, most of the time it is exactly as it seems a catch phrase to help recruit or retain talent. Most companies do not have a clue what it takes to establish a meaningful work environment.

In my opinion, this type of work environment would see each and every employee bring a sense of passion, creativity and meaning to the workplace every day because they feel and see on a personal level that it makes a difference. How? Because management is continuously recognizing, rewarding and celebrating the successes of its employees no matter how large or small.

A couple of years ago I was introduced to a company which stated it offered a meaningful work environment. Senior management was running around giving “lip service” to providing meaningful work” and the majority of the employees were scratching their heads wondering what is so meaningful about this work? Actually, the company did have a good foundation – the problem was too many antiquated managers ingrained in an “old style” of management. Hence if a company is committed in creating a cohesive meaningful work environment it must start with its management to insure each and every one is a leader capable of inspiring employees to bring their best to work every day.

The organization is responsible for creating a meaningful workplace where each and every employee is a part of and contributes to its success. You got it, a cohesive culture continually fostered by the organization. Hmm sounds a little like human resource management – what a concept!

The only way a company can honestly say they offer a meaningful work environment is if each and every employee buys in and understands the concept. Herein is the challenge – each and every employee not just the “superstars” or those deemed to “have potential” but all employees even those who are struggling. All too often struggling employees are mislabelled as underperforming or “poor performers”. It just might be that the employee is under-challenged, and finds the work boring subsequently showing up for work every day becomes a chore. On the other hand maybe the employee finds the work too complicated and does not feel he/she is getting adequate training. In a true meaningful work environment struggling employees become the priority and it is up to management to help inspire the desire to bring their best to work every day.

Let me know what you think – does your company do a good job of offering all its employees meaningful work?

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR). She is an expert in career transition management, recruitment and selection.

Let’s talk about the job search function. Most will agree it is time consuming, depressing at times, humbling and lots of hard work. Yet the individuals who are successful will agree they put in place a job search strategy and worked that strategy every day. No, not all day, but for at least 3-4 hours a day. They stayed focused and committed; and yes, even though tempted to send their resume out to dozens of postings where no fit exists, controlled the urge and stayed true to their specific job search. Think about it, without a job search strategy the hunt becomes scattered and very unproductive. It’s like saving for the future without a financial strategy – good intentions but just doesn’t happen. Sitting in front of a computer and sending out resumes to jobs that do not match one’s expertise, competencies or skills is a big waste of time. I’ve spoken to hundreds of people in career transition over the past year who wonder why they are not getting any response from a resume blast. The majority of these individuals do not have a job search strategy, are not committed and definitely not focused.

Below are 10 action items which should be included in a job search strategy:
1. Prepare a solid resume which depicts strengths, core competencies, learnings and achievements.
2. Conduct an in-depth search on Indeed.ca to compare skills, job titles and roles – get creative with keyword searches.
3. Create a list of targeted companies – use google and Linkedin to research the companies and its people.
4. Attend interviewing techniques, job search strategies and networking workshops to refresh and progress.
5. Complete a behavioural assessment to help identify strengths and areas for developments – promotes awareness and allows individual strengths to be highlighted in the interview or even displayed on the resume.
6. Set up mock interviews before attending the real thing.
7. Network with family, friends, associations, schools, colleges and church parishioners.
8. Put a professional profile on Linkedin (if searching for a corporate role). Use all the tools offered by Linkedin to help stay visible and available to recruiters, HR and the Hiring Manager.
9. Take time off to have fun, relax and spend time with loved ones.
10. Continue to Push Until Something Happens.

Of course everyone is different so the job search strategy will be tailored to the individual’s strengths and competencies. It should be workable, measurable and based on individual special needs and specific requirements. In other words asking someone who is looking for a general labour job to create a profile on Linkedin is not workable.
Let’s face it, searching for a job is a job in itself. However, just like in any job the strong individual performer always comes out on top.

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources and certified as a Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing. She is passionate about recruitment, selection and career transition.

Interesting Article by Gina Cajucom – she is right on – there will be lots of rejection during a job search -“don’t take it personally”……happy reading!!!

Being Rejected

You may have experienced being rejected quite a few times for positions you’ve applied for.  Each time is no better than the one before.  Rejections sting all the time.  Even when you receive tactfully written emails from companies saying they regret not to consider you for the position, you still wish that you had not received them anyway.  After all, no news is bad news when it comes to job application and you would rather not hear the “rejection” notice at all.

Different people react differently to this kind of rejection.  Some will consider this as a challenge or a motivator to do better and prove them wrong.  However, some people might get demoralized and continue to lose confidence.  They may settle for less pay or less attractive role. A client even asked me one time:  “What’s wrong with me?  I thought I was perfect for that role!”

Some people just give up altogether when they see how many people have applied.  Well, no matter how many people lined up for the role, they would definitely hire someone and that someone could very well be you.  Before you begin a litany of everything that is wrong about you, consider that, to some degree, intuition also plays a role in the selection and rating process.

This is why it is important to remember that recruitment, just like any assessment activity, is subject to biases, prejudices, and error in judgment.  Some companies hire unqualified candidates and miss hiring potential stellar performers.  Some companies correct this phenomenon by using specific metrics and highly structured selection process.  “Selection by scoring is a process whereby   selection factor or component run along a scale and is scored by value previously assigned.   Decision is made based on the total score achieved.  Selection by intuition is getting a feel of how a candidate will fit in based on the dynamics of personality that come out in the selection process, either through interviews or role-plays.”  [i]

It is then important for job seekers not to take this kind of rejection personally.  It is not about you.  It is about the unique demands of the position that the company needs to fill.  Sometimes, it is even about the corporate culture that the hiring company needs to consider. At the end of the day, wherever you end up in is the perfect place for you. Not only did you select that company but that company chose you.

Today I was helping a young lady with her job search.  We discussed the typical things – Resume, Job Search and Interview Strategies.   She told me about an interview she recently attended wherein the interviewer asked her “If you could be a fruit, what type of fruit would you be”.   Hmm, I’m surprised these questions are still being asked in interviews.  I immediately asked her if the interviewer disclosed herself as a doctor (psychologist or psychiatrist) – she said no – but could not confirm that the interviewer did not hold this distinguished designation.    Then I asked her if the interview was with Apple – I mean maybe the interviewer was looking for “apple” as a good faith answer – a little interview humour?  However, the company was not Apple.

Ok so here I go – up on my soap box.  What in the world does “fruit” have to do with getting a job as a customer service rep?  I’d like to see that job description – really how do you incorporate “fruit” into the job requirements?  Let’s see – “Must love all fruits” or “Only fruit lovers will be considered” Or “Must be able to deal with all kinds of fruits” – I mean really!!!!

Unless the interviewer is a bona fide psychologist or psychiatrist and knows how to decipher the answer then he/she has no business asking the question.   These types of questions asked by inexperienced interviewers almost always lead to subjective and bias decisions without any measureable evidence to back up the decision.   Think about it – my response might be “a peach” – when I’m asked “why a peach”  I say” because I like peaches” – little do I know that the interviewer dislikes peaches –  or maybe he/she is allergic to peaches – there’s one subjective strike against me.

If you are asking junior shrink questions in the interview try replacing it with a behavioural interview question?  It is much better to identify the skills and competencies required to perform the job and develop behavioural/performance based questions to help you evaluate each candidate consistently – so much more objective.  Remember, poor hiring decisions are very costly; and questions about what type of fruit, colour or dog a person prefers will end up costing your company in more ways than one

Lee Koren is a Human Resource Professional with extensive international experience.  She is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) by the Society for Human Resource Management and a Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing.  Lee possesses over 25 years of experience in selection and recruitment.  She has recruited and hired thousands of resources for large global corporations.  Born and raised in Toronto, Lee spent a large portion of her career in Dallas, Texas where she enhanced her knowledge and expertise in behavioural interviewing.   She has facilitated behavioural interviewing workshops worldwide for corporate leaders.  Lee’s passion and talent is “selection” which inspired her to develop and deliver a variety of workshops.   Lee uses a common sense approach in sharing her vast knowledge.  

Yesterday I had the pleasure of participating in the Day with Donna at Stone Edge Estate a Bed & Breakfast on the Edge of the Niagara Escarpment. It is owned by Doug Rapien and is a beautiful place surrounded by fantastic scenery  – http://www.stoneedgeestate.ca/

We gathered in a luxurious meeting room, a Dentist, Engineers, RN/Health Nutritionist, Artist, Financial Planner and of course me – a Talent Acquisition Specialist. We were strangers brought together by Donna to learn how to take our business to the next level, no matter how small or large. It was an exciting journey and one that was filled with inspiration, laughter and a large amount of learning. By the end of the day, as typical with all of Donna’s events, the strangers became a team collaborating on how best to help each other. We developed measureable goals and over the next 60 days Donna will monitor each and every one of us to insure we are following through. In addition, the team will stay connected offering support as we strive to achieve our business goals.

Donna broadcasted the event on BlogTalkRadio – I invite you to listen to the broadcast and meet the wonderful group of people I had the pleasure of spending the day with:

http://t.co/K7f07Pyx

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and master trainer in behavioural interviewing. Her passion and expertise are in talent acquisition/selection strategies on both the corporate and individual sides. Lee knows how to identify performance skills for a specific role; and how to use social recruiting to find the right talent needed to drive business performance.

I just read this article by Sajjad Masud and totally agree; however this is not exactly new stuff.  I’ve been using social media as a part of the talent acquisition strategy for many years now.  If utilized properly it is a great way to find and connect with hidden talent.  Hope you enjoy the article!

http://mashable.com/2012/06/03/talent-acquisition-social/

 

Lee Koren is a certified as a professional in human resources (PHR) and specializes in recruitment and selection/talent acquisition strategy.  She is certified as a Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing and recognized as an expert when it comes to social recruiting.

Today I’d like to talk about personal strengths.  Each of us has them, yet most of us do not know how to identify and leverage these strengths.    It is a fact that when we are engaging our core strengths we feel much better physically and mentally.   If employed, you are likely to be more engaged at work when utilizing your strengths.  When not using these strengths you may dread going to work, have more negative interactions with your colleagues and achieve less.  Same can be said for the Entrepreneur who may have a great service or product; however, if not utilizing and leveraging their core strengths on a daily basis it can affect their confidence, direction and ability to win business.

So how do you discover your core strengths and better still how do you leverage these strengths?  Well, there are ample books, videos and behavioural assessments available to help with this process.   However, the problem is not so much identifying as it is engaging the strengths on a daily basis.   Ever since I was a young child I have possessed a strong intuitive ability, I am told it is a talent handed down from generation to generation.   As I matured I channeled my gift into my career.  My passion and expertise are in recruitment and selection, I am certified as a Master Trainer in behavioural interviewing and because of my strong intuitive ability I am able to take this methodology to a whole new level.   In 2009, during the high point of the recession I decided to use my talent to help those in career transition.  Utilizing their resume, I took clients through a performance based interview.   Nine times out of ten the results were always the same, we discovered that their key strengths are not displayed on the resume.   Hmm, not so unusual, we are good at depicting our experience but not so good at representing our inner strengths – yet it is our experience coupled with these strengths that make the person and tell the whole story.

Earlier this week I attended Donna Messer’s new book launch “Cycles of Life – Keeping you on Track”.  During a break one of the participants came over to speak to me about his small business and resume.   As with most of us who are starting off in business we look for some type of supplemental income to help pay the bills while we get the business off the ground.    This young man was no different; however he could not understand why he was not getting a better response to his resume.  After all he does have a good technical background.  I asked him to describe himself in a few words – he gave me  “artistic” and “storyteller”,  next I asked him if these words were on his resume – the answer was “no”.   Ok! – So this young man is a graphic artist and my first thought is “artistic and storyteller” are very important when it comes to standing out as a graphic artist – right?  Yet these strengths are not mentioned.  Now if he was a client I would conduct a performance based interview to confirm these strengths and help identify other core competencies along with updating the resume to enhance visibility.   In addition, I would help him verbalize these strengths with examples of successful past performance utilizing the mock interview.   You see, this is my strength and I believe by helping others succeed, I too will be successful.

I encourage everyone to discover and identify their key strengths, but don’t stop there! Figure out the best way to leverage these strengths each and every day whether at work or at play.  If you invest the time to do this I guarantee you will feel better about yourself; and that positive energy you are generating is bound to get you noticed in a very rewarding way!

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Lead Mater Trainer in behavioural interviewing.   She has over 25 years of international experience in recruitment across multiple industries and levels along with developing and implementing talent acquisition strategies.  In addition, Lee possesses a unique talent when it comes to career transition management.


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