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Posts Tagged ‘Selection

Over the past several years there has been a lot of buzz going around about “Meaningful Work”. Companies are incorporating the phrase into their recruitment and performance management strategies stating “We offer a meaningful work environment”. However, most of the time it is exactly as it seems a catch phrase to help recruit or retain talent. Most companies do not have a clue what it takes to establish a meaningful work environment.

In my opinion, this type of work environment would see each and every employee bring a sense of passion, creativity and meaning to the workplace every day because they feel and see on a personal level that it makes a difference. How? Because management is continuously recognizing, rewarding and celebrating the successes of its employees no matter how large or small.

A couple of years ago I was introduced to a company which stated it offered a meaningful work environment. Senior management was running around giving “lip service” to providing meaningful work” and the majority of the employees were scratching their heads wondering what is so meaningful about this work? Actually, the company did have a good foundation – the problem was too many antiquated managers ingrained in an “old style” of management. Hence if a company is committed in creating a cohesive meaningful work environment it must start with its management to insure each and every one is a leader capable of inspiring employees to bring their best to work every day.

The organization is responsible for creating a meaningful workplace where each and every employee is a part of and contributes to its success. You got it, a cohesive culture continually fostered by the organization. Hmm sounds a little like human resource management – what a concept!

The only way a company can honestly say they offer a meaningful work environment is if each and every employee buys in and understands the concept. Herein is the challenge – each and every employee not just the “superstars” or those deemed to “have potential” but all employees even those who are struggling. All too often struggling employees are mislabelled as underperforming or “poor performers”. It just might be that the employee is under-challenged, and finds the work boring subsequently showing up for work every day becomes a chore. On the other hand maybe the employee finds the work too complicated and does not feel he/she is getting adequate training. In a true meaningful work environment struggling employees become the priority and it is up to management to help inspire the desire to bring their best to work every day.

Let me know what you think – does your company do a good job of offering all its employees meaningful work?

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR). She is an expert in career transition management, recruitment and selection.

I just read this article written by Erin Carson – it has some very good pointers if one is in the market for a video resume. Most of you know I sit on the fence when it comes to a video resume – why? Well because it usually does more harm than good. People are only human and tend to be subjective which leads to unfounded and non-supported biases. However, as Erin states, a video resume may make sense if done in the right setting with the proper equipment within an industry which requires strong presentation skills – Enjoy!

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/video-resumes-the-dos-and-donts/

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing. Her core competencies are Recruitment, Selection and Career Transition.

Let’s talk about the job search function. Most will agree it is time consuming, depressing at times, humbling and lots of hard work. Yet the individuals who are successful will agree they put in place a job search strategy and worked that strategy every day. No, not all day, but for at least 3-4 hours a day. They stayed focused and committed; and yes, even though tempted to send their resume out to dozens of postings where no fit exists, controlled the urge and stayed true to their specific job search. Think about it, without a job search strategy the hunt becomes scattered and very unproductive. It’s like saving for the future without a financial strategy – good intentions but just doesn’t happen. Sitting in front of a computer and sending out resumes to jobs that do not match one’s expertise, competencies or skills is a big waste of time. I’ve spoken to hundreds of people in career transition over the past year who wonder why they are not getting any response from a resume blast. The majority of these individuals do not have a job search strategy, are not committed and definitely not focused.

Below are 10 action items which should be included in a job search strategy:
1. Prepare a solid resume which depicts strengths, core competencies, learnings and achievements.
2. Conduct an in-depth search on Indeed.ca to compare skills, job titles and roles – get creative with keyword searches.
3. Create a list of targeted companies – use google and Linkedin to research the companies and its people.
4. Attend interviewing techniques, job search strategies and networking workshops to refresh and progress.
5. Complete a behavioural assessment to help identify strengths and areas for developments – promotes awareness and allows individual strengths to be highlighted in the interview or even displayed on the resume.
6. Set up mock interviews before attending the real thing.
7. Network with family, friends, associations, schools, colleges and church parishioners.
8. Put a professional profile on Linkedin (if searching for a corporate role). Use all the tools offered by Linkedin to help stay visible and available to recruiters, HR and the Hiring Manager.
9. Take time off to have fun, relax and spend time with loved ones.
10. Continue to Push Until Something Happens.

Of course everyone is different so the job search strategy will be tailored to the individual’s strengths and competencies. It should be workable, measurable and based on individual special needs and specific requirements. In other words asking someone who is looking for a general labour job to create a profile on Linkedin is not workable.
Let’s face it, searching for a job is a job in itself. However, just like in any job the strong individual performer always comes out on top.

Lee Koren is certified as a Professional in Human Resources and certified as a Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing. She is passionate about recruitment, selection and career transition.

I just read this article by Sajjad Masud and totally agree; however this is not exactly new stuff.  I’ve been using social media as a part of the talent acquisition strategy for many years now.  If utilized properly it is a great way to find and connect with hidden talent.  Hope you enjoy the article!

http://mashable.com/2012/06/03/talent-acquisition-social/

 

Lee Koren is a certified as a professional in human resources (PHR) and specializes in recruitment and selection/talent acquisition strategy.  She is certified as a Master Trainer in Behavioural Interviewing and recognized as an expert when it comes to social recruiting.

To all my fellow Blog writers and readers I wish to extend a happy holiday season greeting.  I hope 2011 was good to you and that 2012 is even better. 

I will be back next year with tips for individuals who are in career transition; and of course tips for corporations about recruiting and selecting the very best talent. 

It is no secret that good people drive business performance yet most companies do not have a selection strategy.   Yep, it is still tough out there and if the hiring process is not done correctly it is definitely costly.  Given the economic situation can your corporation afford the cost?

 Until next year………………….

Lee Koren, PHR

I know there are companies out there promoting Video Bios and Interviews; yep they want a piece of the action.  However before you leap, please consider a few facts.

  1. Technology cannot change the way a person thinks and unfortunately humans still have biases and make subjective decisions on what they see.
  2. Would you really want to be disqualified from an invite to interview on company site just because you wore a red tie during your video?  I know it might be an exaggeration, however you get the message.

If done properly, the Resume is still the best vehicle to get you in the door.    I have helped many people optimize their resume base on key strengths, competencies and accomplishments.  I read somewhere that an employer makes an impression in the first 5 minutes of the interview, do you really want that first impression to be via video?  At least, if you are face to face or even over the telephone you still have some control.      An alternative may be to create an audio interview highlighting key competencies and strengths as you talk through the resume

I am still very cautious about promoting job seekers to spend money on creating a Video Bio or Interview.   Now I will agree there may be folks out there who are good in front of the camera and a video may make sense if the job requires someone to be in front of the camera or involved in presentations in front of large audiences.  However, until technology can take the bias out of the video bio and/or interview my preference is still the good old fashion face to face interview. 

Lee Koren is a certified as a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) specializing in selection and recruitment.

This is a an awesome on-line publication created by Donna Messer and her team at ConnectUs Canada.   I was thrilled my article was selected to be published in the “Business” section.  Please take a few minutes to read the article and scan the entire publication!

http://bit.ly/pOvQIP


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